Without VA Lease Authority, Veterans To Be Denied Care

                                                                             

Without VA Lease Authority, Veterans To Be Denied             Care              

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Please Contact Your Elected Officials Today!

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plans to open 38 new community outpatient clinics, in 22 states and territories, between now and 2017. These clinics will be in leased buildings,   with VA employees providing the services. This same arrangement has worked well in hundreds of existing VA clinics, nationwide. Last year, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), an  independent arm of Congress, decided these lease contracts would  become long-term debts of the federal government. In considering  the first 15 leases, Congress, based on the new CBO     interpretation, forced VA to find funds for all 15 leases to cover an entire 20-year leasing period, rather than provide the money for only the first year. The authorizing law only requires the  first year to be funded, with future payments to be managed   through the annual VA budget. Because VA could not pay the entire           cost (between $1.2 and $1.5 billion) in the first year for 15 clinics, this new interpretation effectively stopped all VA proposed leases. This program, both new clinic leases and renewals  for existing leases, is now in jeopardy.

Without these clinics, VA will be denying care to veterans in  need, while making their health care more expensive overall. The cost to the government is far less than construction of major VA  hospitals. Without the ability to lease, from a practical point of  view the change in Congressional policy forces VA to buy land and  build government-owned clinics, or to do nothing. At a minimum this new requirement will add years to the existing planning  process, will delay or deny care for veterans, and is unacceptable to veterans who need VA health care.VA is managing almost 900 existing community-based outpatient  clinics, all established under the prior policy, and operating   under leases. Veterans who receive this care are highly satisfied. In our opinion this successful arrangement should not be abandoned at the expense of 340,000 or more veterans who would be denied               care.

Please use the prepared letter, or write your own letter, to   urge your two Senators and Member of the House of Representatives to solve this problem, to ensure veterans receive the care they earned and deserve. Recently, the Executive Directors of the major veterans service organizations sent a letter to Congressional               leaders expressing our concerns

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