Army Standardizes PTSD Diagnosis

Army Standardizes PTSD Diagnosis

Week of August 20, 2012

The U.S. Army, along with the other military services and the Department of Veterans Affairs, is standardizing the diagnosis and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Army medical community is now being trained on guidelines spelled out in Army Medical Command Policy Memo 12-035 (Apr. 10, 2012), Policy Guidance on the Assessment and Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The memo emphasizes the urgency of the issue. PTSD occurs in three to six percent of servicemembers with no deployment experience and in five to 25 percent of servicemembers who have been deployed to combat zones. For PTSD resources, visit the Army Behavioral Health PTSD Information webpage <http://www.behavioralhealth.army.mil/ptsd/index.html> . For an immediate crisis, visit the National Suicide Prevention Hotline website <http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/>  and call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) <http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/> .

 

 

Army Lab Analyzes Bad Dust From War Zones


February 2012  

By Eric Beidel 

The Army Research Laboratory has deployed equipment to Iraq, Afghanistan and
Africa to find out if particles floating around in the air in these places
are causing Gulf War Syndrome and other illnesses.

The Aerosol Davis Rotating-drum Universal-size-cut Monitoring (DRUM)
instrument captures particles to create a library of samples that military
doctors and other researchers can access to determine air quality at any
given date and hour. The tool can pinpoint concentration of elements such as
lead, nickel, iron and sulfur, which often result in health complaints from
soldiers.

Every three weeks, drums are retrieved from overseas for analysis and
replaced with new instruments. Researchers want to create a kit that would
allow real-time analysis to see what is in the air and predict what may be
floating around soon.

The focus is on smaller particles that can get deep inside the lungs,
officials said. Larger elements “don’t ever get past your nose and have much
less of a chance of making you ill,” said Alan Wetmore, who works in the
Army Research Lab’s atmospheric sensing branch.

In addition to helping military doctors understand medical cases, the
research could provide a clearer picture of the threat of dust to soldiers
for those who design uniforms and masks for troops.

Starting this year, the lab began collecting samples at Camp Lemonnier,
Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, where the primary U.S. base is located
downwind from stadium-sized burn pits. Everything from tires to animal
carcasses are set on fire in these chasms.